disneylandguru:

Origins of name: This bridge spanning Buena Vista Street is modeled after the Glendale-Hyperion Bridge, a concrete arch-bridge viaduct built in 1928 that carries cars over the Los Angeles River, connecting Los Angeles’ Silver Lake neighborhood to Glendale.
Fictional back story: On Buena Vista Street, at least one business advertises its proximity to the bridge. “We’re under the bridge,” says an ad for Big Top Toys. The store’s entrance is, in fact, directly under the bridge.
What it really does: Carries the Disneyland Monorail track

I live super close to the original bridge - just drove on it yesterday.  =) The Walt Disney Studios were located about one block from the beginning/top of the bridge from 1929 - 1939, on Hyperion Avenue. I’m sure this is why it’s replicated at Disneyland.


William Powell and Carole Lombard on their wedding day, June 26, 1931

William Powell and Carole Lombard on their wedding day, June 26, 1931

And it followed that a boy and girl romance developed between Bebe and Harold Lloyd. He was her first ‘date’. By nature he was shy and it took him some time to pluck up the courage to ask Phyllis (Bebe’s mother) if he could take Bebe out. Phyllis was strict with Bebe as she was still underage. But Phyllis did agree that Harold could take her to movies and to dances, provided he brought her home ‘real early’.

Harold and Bebe were happy together and at one time very much in love. He asked her to marry him. He bought a diamond, had it made into a tie-pin, and if and when Bebe said ‘yes’, he would have it remade into an engagement ring. The diamond remained a tie-pin.

From “Bebe And Ben” by Jill Allgood (quote about Bebe Daniel’s relationship with Harold Lloyd)  - 1975. (via fyeah-haroldlloyd)

chaplinfortheages:

Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks & Oscar Price (President of United Artists) 1919

gatabella:

Teeny tiny ivory lace dress worn by Hepburn for the final scene in her first proper film, Roman Holiday, in 1952.
The waist is 24 inches, the bust 34 inches. But the dress was probably smaller when it was worn by Hepburn, a fact that gives the first insight into her character.

Audrey would have all her costumes and gowns made with a generous seam allowance so that, when she gave the clothes away, which she invariably did, the new owner could let out the seams and fit them perfectly. Audrey was so generous. She liked to give things away rather than let them languish in a wardrobe.

Audrey went on to win a Best Actress Oscar for Roman Holiday  in 1954 and wore the same lace gown designed by Edith Head, with some alterations done by her new friend the couturier Hubert de Givenchy, to collect her award.

And when her wedding to Lord James Hanson was cancelled she gave away her simple wedding gown to a poor peasant girl in Italy.

huntingtonlibrary:

Going on public view THIS SATURDAY for the first time ever is an autographed manuscript of Jack London’s The Sea Wolf. Now get this: Out of concern about the risk of fire on their Sonoma Valley ranch, London and his wife, Charmian, put this manuscript in a “flameproof” bank vault in San Francisco. That vault—and this manuscript—burned in the devastating fire that erupted in the wake of the 1906 earthquake. We got the charred manuscript—along with some other pretty great London items—from his widow back in the 1920s, and our curators have never removed this delicate charred work from its metal box. And now it’s going on view in our newly reimagined, redesigned, and reinstalled Library Exhibition Hall, opening this Saturday (Nov. 9). COME CHECK IT OUT.

huntingtonlibrary:

Going on public view THIS SATURDAY for the first time ever is an autographed manuscript of Jack London’s The Sea Wolf. Now get this: Out of concern about the risk of fire on their Sonoma Valley ranch, London and his wife, Charmian, put this manuscript in a “flameproof” bank vault in San Francisco. That vault—and this manuscript—burned in the devastating fire that erupted in the wake of the 1906 earthquake. We got the charred manuscript—along with some other pretty great London items—from his widow back in the 1920s, and our curators have never removed this delicate charred work from its metal box. And now it’s going on view in our newly reimagined, redesigned, and reinstalled Library Exhibition Hall, opening this Saturday (Nov. 9). COME CHECK IT OUT.

Boris Karloff was a very sweet, wonderful man, and I just loved him. Immediately, from being on the lot, and taking his hand, I just loved him. I had no fear of him, whatsoever. We seemed to have a rapport together - and it was like magic.
Marilyn Harris - child actress who played the little girl in “Frankenstein” (1931)

“I’ve had enough… I don’t want to be remembered as somebody who couldn’t do nothin’ but take her clothes off.  I want somethin’ real now.”

Clara Bow (d. September 27, 1965), on retiring from films in 1933.


Buster Keaton’s Recipe For His Famous Pork Pie Hats (in his own words):
PORKPIE HAT1 Stetson Hat3 Heaping Teaspoons of granulated sugar1 Teacup Warm WaterMix water and sugar. Wet the top and bottom of the brim. Smooth it out on a clean, hard surface. Allow to dry until stiff.I did the early ones myself myself, always - and then I trained my wife.(The first one was created in 1917 for “The Butcher’s Boy”)

Happy Birthday, Joseph Frank “Buster” Keaton - (October 4th, 1895 - February 6th, 1966)

Buster Keaton’s Recipe For His Famous Pork Pie Hats (in his own words):

PORKPIE HAT

1 Stetson Hat
3 Heaping Teaspoons of granulated sugar
1 Teacup Warm Water

Mix water and sugar. Wet the top and bottom of the brim. Smooth it out on a clean, hard surface. Allow to dry until stiff.

I did the early ones myself myself, always - and then I trained my wife.

(The first one was created in 1917 for “The Butcher’s Boy”)

Happy Birthday, Joseph Frank “Buster” Keaton - (October 4th, 1895 - February 6th, 1966)

They’re not your crowd; you’ll lose.
Harold Lloyd to Buster Keaton, on his move to MGM in 1928 (via fyeah-haroldlloyd)

The Bradbury Mansion in Los Angeles, CA - Occupied for years by various film companies and onetime home to Hal Roach’s Rollin Film Company.  It was so drafty that Harold Lloyd dubbed it “Pneumonia Hall”.  c.  (Sadly, it was demolished in 1929).

The Bradbury Mansion in Los Angeles, CA - Occupied for years by various film companies and onetime home to Hal Roach’s Rollin Film Company.  It was so drafty that Harold Lloyd dubbed it “Pneumonia Hall”.  c.  (Sadly, it was demolished in 1929).

bookorithms:

Charles Dickens reads to his daughters Mamie and Kate in the garden at Gad’s Hill, Kent.  1865

bookorithms:

Charles Dickens reads to his daughters Mamie and Kate in the garden at Gad’s Hill, Kent.  1865

ilovelucyball:

Happy Birthday Lucille Désiréé Ball!

(August 6, 1911 - April 26, 1989)

"On an August the sixth, this world of ours took little note then but will long, long remember. Be proud Lucy of your legacy, very proud. Be aware as you sit here among your grateful friends, the sun never sets on Lucille Ball."

-Sammy Davis Jr.

Nickelodeons were the early motion-picture theaters, so named because admission typically cost a nickel. Nickelodeons offered continuous showings of one- and two-reel films, lasting from 15 minutes to one hour and accompanied by a piano. The success of the Pittsburgh nickelodeon established in 1905 by Harry Davis made it the model for their rapid proliferation throughout the U.S. By 1910 they numbered 10,000, fueling a huge demand for silent films and projection equipment and providing the impetus for the development of the modern motion-picture industry.[*] The heyday of the Nickelodeon lasted less than 10 years. When the studios began making feature-length films, theaters were charged higher rentals. Admission prices climbed to 10-cents or more. Larger, more ornate theaters were built, complete with balconies, carpeting and even proscenium arches. One by one, the nickelodeons either went out of businesses or were renovated to accommodate larger, more sophisticated crowds.[*]

Uniformed waitresses pose for the camera in Los Angeles, CA - c. Late 1920s