Betty Boop knows how to throw a cold shoulder in “Red Hot Mama” (1934)

Betty Boop knows how to throw a cold shoulder in “Red Hot Mama” (1934)


Betty Boop knows how to throw an icey stare in “Red Hot Mama” (1934)

Betty Boop knows how to throw an icey stare in “Red Hot Mama” (1934)

Betty Boop in “Betty In Blunderland” (1934)

fortunecookied:

Betty Boop - Bimbo’s Initiation (1931)

Bimbo has to undergo a series of harrowing rituals as part of a secret society initiation before eventually discovering the true identity of the order’s mysterious leader. This surreal short was the last Betty Boop cartoon to be animated by her co-creator Grim Natwick.


Betty Boop opening titles (1932) - Max Fleischer

Betty Boop opening titles (1932) - Max Fleischer

theholeinbabyshead:

1930’s Fleischer Studios Betty Boop & Bimbo wood composition jointed dolls

theholeinbabyshead:

1930’s Fleischer Studios Betty Boop & Bimbo wood composition jointed dolls

fortunecookied:

Color Classics were a series of Technicolor animated shorts produced by Fleischer Studios as a competitor to Walt Disney’s Silly Symphonies. Many of the cartoons used Max Fleischer’s Stereoptical process, which created an illusion of depth by animating against 3D background sets.

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Betty Boop in Max Fleischer’s Poor Cinderella - 1934


Betty Boop is smitten in “There’s Something About A Soldier” (1934)

Betty Boop is smitten in “There’s Something About A Soldier” (1934)


Betty Boop knows how to throw a cold shoulder in “Red Hot Mama” (1934)

Betty Boop knows how to throw a cold shoulder in “Red Hot Mama” (1934)


Betty Boop knows how to throw an icey stare in “Red Hot Mama” (1934)

Betty Boop knows how to throw an icey stare in “Red Hot Mama” (1934)


Betty Boop is a flirty girl in “Admission Free” (1932) - Max Fleischer

Betty Boop is a flirty girl in “Admission Free” (1932) - Max Fleischer

Betty gets the job with “Betty Boop’s Big Boss” (1932) - Max Fleischer

bettybooplover:

My Friend the Monkey (1939)

Betty Boop loses her top while Bimbo loses his heart in “Any Rags” (1932) - Max Fleischer

A Pre-code cartoon - after the Hays Code went into effect in 1934, Betty’s image changed and the Fleischer Brothers were forced to depict her in skirts below the knees and as a much more demure character.