astairical:

David Niven reads a note from Ginger Rogers at the American Film Institute (AFI) tribute to Fred Astaire.  (1981)


Ginger Rogers & Fred Astaire in The Barkleys of Broadway (1949).

Ginger Rogers & Fred Astaire in The Barkleys of Broadway (1949).

vkm11:

Ginger Rogers featured in Photoplay Magazine, July 1933

vkm11:

Ginger Rogers featured in Photoplay Magazine, July 1933

"Top Hat" (1935)

forties-fifties-sixties-love:

Trying to look like Ginger Rogers

forties-fifties-sixties-love:

Trying to look like Ginger Rogers

the-dark-city:

Happy Birthday, Ginger Rogers - July 16th, 1911 - April 25th, 1995
"The most important thing in anyone’s life is to be giving something. The quality I can give is fun, joy and happiness. This is my gift."

the-dark-city:

Happy Birthday, Ginger Rogers - July 16th, 1911 - April 25th, 1995

"The most important thing in anyone’s life is to be giving something. The quality I can give is fun, joy and happiness. This is my gift."

forties-fifties-sixties-love:

Ginger Rogers
lanallure:

Ginger Rogers reading an issue of Vogue magazine in a publicity still for Honor Among Lovers, 1931.

lanallure:

Ginger Rogers reading an issue of Vogue magazine in a publicity still for Honor Among Lovers, 1931.

msmildred:

James Stewart and Ginger Rogers holding their Oscar statuettes at the 13th Academy Awards, February 1941.

msmildred:

James Stewart and Ginger Rogers holding their Oscar statuettes at the 13th Academy Awards, February 1941.

Top Hat, 1935 (via maudit)


Boris Karloff and Ginger Rogers at a gala Hollywood Christmas party - 1932

Boris Karloff and Ginger Rogers at a gala Hollywood Christmas party - 1932

Ginger Rogers and her cool shoes - c. 1930s

Ginger Rogers and her cool shoes - c. 1930s

Ginger Rogers in her Yama Yama Man costume for “The Story Of Vernon and Irene Castle” (1939)

Ginger Rogers in her Yama Yama Man costume for “The Story Of Vernon and Irene Castle” (1939)

Ginger Rogers - Let Yourself Go
891 plays

hedda-hopper:

Ginger Rogers with Jimmy Dorsey and His Orchestra, Let Yourself Go, Words and Music by Irving Berlin.  Featured in the film, Follow the Fleet (RKO, 1936)

"Shall We Dance" (1937)

"Shall We Dance" (1937)