Buster Keaton and Virginia Fox in “Neighbors” (1920)

fuckyeahmodernflapper:

Buster Keaton and Thelma Todd in ‘Speak Easily’, 1932.

fuckyeahmodernflapper:

Buster Keaton and Thelma Todd in ‘Speak Easily’, 1932.


Buster Keaton’s “The Frozen North” (1922)

Buster Keaton’s “The Frozen North” (1922)

Buster Keaton in “The Frozen North” (1922)

theprolific:

Sherlock Jr. (1924)

Buster Keaton and Sybil Seely - “One Week” (1920)


Buster Keaton with Alice Lake and Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle in Coney Island (1917)

Buster Keaton with Alice Lake and Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle in Coney Island (1917)

oldshowbiz:

Buster Keaton ad and announcement - 1927.

oldshowbiz:

Buster Keaton ad and announcement - 1927.

Buster Keaton’s “The Three Ages” (1923)

Buster Keaton’s “The Three Ages” (1923)

"Day Dreams" (1922)

"Day Dreams" (1922)


Buster Keaton’s “One Week” (1920)

It’s almost here………

Buster Keaton’s “One Week” (1920)

It’s almost here………

"Hollywood Steps Out" (1941) - Tex Avery

Buster Keaton and Jackie Cooper in matching porkpie hats  - c. 1930’s
Publicity photo for “Buddies”, an MGM film which was never made

Buster Keaton and Jackie Cooper in matching porkpie hats  - c. 1930’s

Publicity photo for “Buddies”, an MGM film which was never made

arealbuster:

Convict 13 (1920) was the second of Buster’s shorts to reach theaters, but the third he made — he was dissatisfied with The High Sign (1921) and shelved it for a later release, once his reputation was more firmly established and its defects would be of reduced consequence.

That we can enjoy Convict 13 today is something of a minor miracle—the ravages of time had eaten away at available copies until only fragments remained. Then, in the 1970s, Raymond Rohauer pieced together copies unearthed around the world to reassemble a nearly complete reconstruction.

There are grim jokes aplenty in this short —one key sequence involves the intended execution of Buster Keaton. It takes an especially dark comic imagination to seek laughs in the hanging of an innocent man. Buster Keaton, though, finds a way to make that hangman’s noose his ally.

"Sherlock Jr." (1924)

"Sherlock Jr." (1924)