theidentitymad:

Another gifset of this scene because I love it so much

"Mr. Smith Goes To Washington" (1939)

wehadfacesthen:

Lisa Fonssagrives on the Eiffel Tower, a photo by Erwin Blumfeld for Vogue, 1939

wehadfacesthen:

Lisa Fonssagrives on the Eiffel Tower, a photo by Erwin Blumfeld for Vogue, 1939

kittypackards:

 There’s a philosophy in The Wizard of Oz that speaks to all of us. Everyone has a heart, a brain and courage. If used properly, they lead to a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. The gold when found, is those people who love you.

— Ray Bolger

Minnie gets flowers from Mickey Mouse in “Mickey’s Surprise Party” (1939) - Walt Disney

twostriptechnicolor:

1939 World’s Fair - The Westinghouse Pavilion

The theme of the fair was The World Of Tomorrow, and one of the exhibits that best embodied it was the one from the Westinghouse Corporation. Nowadays it would look like blatant corporate shilling, but to depression era audiences, the promise of future full of convenient electric appliances was more than appealing.

The exhibits included a fully electric kitchen, hands-on industrial machinery you could play with, a bicycle held up by light beams, and most famously, the Westinghouse time capsule (to be opened in 6939), and Electro the Moto-man. The latter would become one of the more emblematic exhibits from the fair and could move on its own, count on his fingers, smoke cigarettes, and trade barbs with his “trainer”.

It’s also one of two exhibits at the fair to get their own Technicolor film. In this case it’s The Middleton Family At The New York World’s Fair.

twostriptechnicolor:

75 Years ago today, the New York World’s Fair opened.  (1939)

Covering over 1200 acres in Flushing Meadows, the New York World’s Fair of 1939 showcased the latest in technological and scientific advances, as well as exhibits from 60 countries, including Soviet Russia.

Some of the most notable displays included the Futurama, a massive model of the world of 1960, RCA’s television sets, Borden’s fully automatic milking parlor (which introduced Elsie the cow), the Westinghouse time capsule, Electro the Moto-Man, and even hosted the very first sc-fi convention. In addition to the technological, educational and social purpose exhibits, the fair included a massive midway that was described as “The greatest amusement park ever…. at least until Disneyland”. This amusement area featured a roller coaster, the Lifesavers Parachute Drop (which still stands in Coney Island), and rather shockingly, an array of shows featuring topless girls - including one designed by Salvador Dali.

More posts on the fair to come!

Cookies and kisses with Minnie Mouse for “Mickey’s Surprise Party” (1939) - "Oh boy!"

costumefilms:

The Wizard of Oz (1939) - costume tests on Judy Garland as Dorothy.

According to Alison Nastasi, “there were several different pinafores costume designers explored using in The Wizard of Oz before settling on the famous gingham dress worn by Judy Garland. They also tried out various wigs (including a blonde one), makeup styles (one very baby-doll-esque), and shoes (one pair Arabian in style). Judy’s stand-in also had her own dress — a sepia-rinsed version for the scene when Dorothy opens up the farmhouse door and the movie switches to Technicolor.”

The Wizard of Oz (1939)

Mickey Mouse and Pluto in Walt Disney’s “Society Dog Show” (1939)

fantomas-en-cavale:

Simone Simon aux courses de Longchamp par les Frères Seeberger, mai 1939.

fantomas-en-cavale:

Simone Simon aux courses de Longchamp par les Frères Seeberger, mai 1939.

bettybooplover:

My Friend the Monkey (1939)


Donald Duck and Greta Garbo in "The Autograph Hound" (1939) - Walt Disney

Donald Duck and Greta Garbo in "The Autograph Hound" (1939) - Walt Disney

Pluto and Fifi - Mickey Mouse Magazine 1939

Pluto and Fifi - Mickey Mouse Magazine 1939

Donald Duck and Shirley Temple exchange autographs in Walt Disney’s The Autograph Hound (1939)