get to know me meme: [1/5] animated movies » 101 dalmatians (1961)

"My story begins in London, not so very long ago. And yet so much has happened since then, that it seems more like an eternity."


Harold and Bebe’s sassy parrot - “Just Neighbors” (1919)

Harold and Bebe’s sassy parrot - “Just Neighbors” (1919)

Mickey and Minnie Mouse in “O Sole Minnie” (2014)

saisonciel:

Eleanor Boardman, 1920s

saisonciel:

Eleanor Boardman, 1920s


"Funny Little Bunnies"  (1934) - Walt Disney

"Funny Little Bunnies"  (1934) - Walt Disney

Gifts for the prisoner of “The Phantom Of The Opera” (1925)

Well, I think I’ll call him Bambi.

Bambi… Yep, I guess that’ll do all right.

Harold Lloyd - “Among Those Present” (1921)

twostriptechnicolor:

Hollywood Boulevard, 1931.

twostriptechnicolor:

Hollywood Boulevard, 1931.

Nini Theilade in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, 1935

classicladiesofcolor:

"Queen of the Boogie", Hadda Brooks

classicladiesofcolor:

"Queen of the Boogie", Hadda Brooks

llionkings:

locations - beast’s castle ♔

So we went over to the Loire Valley in France where the River Loire runs along. […] And there was one chateau that just stood out as stunning. It was the one of Chambord, built by François de Pontbriant. And he designed this castle that just had this imposing power and strength to it. And the truth of that place adds credibility to your drawing in a funny kind of a way. I guess, you know, just to explain to you a little bit about how I think, and when I was a kid, I didn’t do drawings to do a drawing of something. I did a drawing so I could enter into an imaginary world. My paper was like a magic mirror that I could do a drawing, and you just step right through it and suddenly you’re living in the time of the dinosaurs, or you’re living somewhere and you’re experiencing it. And that with that castle, that was really important as a place where I could step into it - Glen Keane [Discovering the Beauty in the Beast.]

Harold’s caught a lion by the tail!   "Among Those Present" (1921)

costumefilms:

The Wizard of Oz (1939) - costume tests on Judy Garland as Dorothy.

According to Alison Nastasi, “there were several different pinafores costume designers explored using in The Wizard of Oz before settling on the famous gingham dress worn by Judy Garland. They also tried out various wigs (including a blonde one), makeup styles (one very baby-doll-esque), and shoes (one pair Arabian in style). Judy’s stand-in also had her own dress — a sepia-rinsed version for the scene when Dorothy opens up the farmhouse door and the movie switches to Technicolor.”