Buster Keaton - The Haunted House (1921)

wherearewedamfino:

coneypylon:

Time to relive my childhood.

The first film I watched in which I heard the voice of Buster Keaton

thehystericalsociety:

Posed on the steps - c. late 20s/ early 30s  - (Via)

thehystericalsociety:

Posed on the steps - c. late 20s/ early 30s  - (Via)


Betty Boop knows how to throw a cold shoulder in “Red Hot Mama” (1934)

Betty Boop knows how to throw a cold shoulder in “Red Hot Mama” (1934)

Donald Duck in “The Three Caballeros” (1940)

Marian Marsh - c. late 1920s

Mickey Mouse hates alarm clocks in “Sleepwalkin’” (2013)

Mary Astor   c. 1920’s

Mary Astor   c. 1920’s


Betty Boop knows how to throw an icey stare in “Red Hot Mama” (1934)

Betty Boop knows how to throw an icey stare in “Red Hot Mama” (1934)

saisonciel:

Marilyn Miller in Sally (1929)

saisonciel:

Marilyn Miller in Sally (1929)


Walt Disney’s “Plane Crazy” (1928) by U.B. Iwerks

Walt Disney’s “Plane Crazy” (1928) by U.B. Iwerks

Harold Lloyd looks fetching in a veil………….Ask Father (1919)

Mickey Mouse causes a mad stampede down the “Fire Escape” (2014)


Orson Welles (May 6th,1915 - October 10th, 1985) arrives at the premiere of “Citizen Kane” (1941) 
"Style is knowing who you are, what you want to say, and not giving a damn."

Orson Welles (May 6th,1915 - October 10th, 1985) arrives at the premiere of “Citizen Kane” (1941) 

"Style is knowing who you are, what you want to say, and not giving a damn."

twostriptechnicolor:

1939 World’s Fair - The Westinghouse Pavilion

The theme of the fair was The World Of Tomorrow, and one of the exhibits that best embodied it was the one from the Westinghouse Corporation. Nowadays it would look like blatant corporate shilling, but to depression era audiences, the promise of future full of convenient electric appliances was more than appealing.

The exhibits included a fully electric kitchen, hands-on industrial machinery you could play with, a bicycle held up by light beams, and most famously, the Westinghouse time capsule (to be opened in 6939), and Electro the Moto-man. The latter would become one of the more emblematic exhibits from the fair and could move on its own, count on his fingers, smoke cigarettes, and trade barbs with his “trainer”.

It’s also one of two exhibits at the fair to get their own Technicolor film. In this case it’s The Middleton Family At The New York World’s Fair.