kittenmeats:

"A Midsummer Night’s Dream" (1935) - William Dieterle, Max Reinhardt

Reblogging because yet another reposter/thief

kittenmeats:

"A Midsummer Night’s Dream" (1935) - William Dieterle, Max Reinhardt

Reblogging because yet another reposter/thief


William Powell and Carole Lombard on their wedding day, June 26, 1931

William Powell and Carole Lombard on their wedding day, June 26, 1931

Mickey and Minnie Mouse flirt in "Puppy Love" (1933)

studiioghibli:

Studio Ghibli » 40 Characters

dianapowell:

Bill Powell + comedic moments

adelphe:

Falling in Love No. 36, August 1960

adelphe:

Falling in Love No. 36, August 1960

dfilms:

Peter Pan, 1953

dfilms:

Peter Pan, 1953

the-dark-city:

Guy Kibbee is disappointed………….Dames (1934)
This is my original and the stolen one is now making the rounds here *again*- this is why I don’t make many things any more and the same reason so many of us who do are fed up…..

the-dark-city:

Guy Kibbee is disappointed………….Dames (1934)

This is my original and the stolen one is now making the rounds here *again*- this is why I don’t make many things any more and the same reason so many of us who do are fed up…..

Vintage Hollywood Actresses in Valentine’s Day poses - (1930’s - 1950’s)


Mildred Davis and Harold Lloyd - c. early1920’s

Mildred Davis and Harold Lloyd - c. early1920’s

"Tarzan" (1999)

fyeah-haroldlloyd:

"Haunted Spooks" (1920)

fyeah-haroldlloyd:

"Haunted Spooks" (1920)

pickurselfup:

Douglas Fairbanks Jr. in The Power of the Press, 1928


Minnie Mouse loves her flowers from Mickey in “Puppy Love” (1933)

Minnie Mouse loves her flowers from Mickey in “Puppy Love” (1933)

theladybadass:

Jackie Ormes (August 1, 1911 – December 26, 1985) is known as the first African American female cartoonist. Her strips, featuring the lovable characters Torchy Brown, Candy, Patty-Jo, and Ginger, appeared in the Chicago Defender and Pittsburgh Courier in the 1930s - 1950s. 

Jackie Ormes said, “No more…Sambos…Just KIDS!” and she transformed her attractive, spunky Patty-Jo cartoon character into the first upscale American black doll. At long last, here was an African American doll with all the play features children desired: playable hair, and the finest and most extensive wardrobe on the market, with all manner of dresses, formals, shoes, hats, nightgowns, robes, skating and cowgirl costumes, and spring and winter coat sets, to name a few. (Jackie Ormes Online)